The DC Madam’s attorney threatened April 8 to release the government and business names of her clients this week unless federal courts grant a hearing on his request to release those in a still-hidden clientele he claims as highly relevant to this year's presidential and congressional races.

Montgomery Blair Sibley, former attorney to the late Deborah Jeane Palfrey when she was notorious as “The DC Madam” during her federal prosecution a decade ago, said he will fight the U.S. Supreme Court’s rejection this week of his case without a hearing.

Ted Cruz National Enquirer Story“I’m going to release a list of the agencies,” Sibley told Alex Jones Infowars broadcast host David Knight. Sibley said he would disclose workplaces and “not specific names” of customers, whose identities remain suppressed under the still-pending order in May 2007 by Palfrey’s federal trial judge in Washington, DC.

Update: On Monday April 11, Sibley has started to identify those who called the escort service of his former client. In a court filing in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia obtained by WTOP, Montgomery Blair Sibley included the names of 174 of the entities that had dialed Palfrey’s business, as station WTOP reported in Ex-lawyer starts disclosing who called ‘D.C. Madam.’

The list of released entities includes the following government agencies: Department of Health and Human Services, FBI, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command, Internal Revenue Service, National Drug Intelligence Center, National Geospatial Intelligence Agency, U.S. Coast Guard, U.S. Army Information Systems Command and Department of State.

Sibley has said his First Amendment rights are being violated when the courts will not allow even a hearing about why the public deserves to know the names of high officials and future leaders who used Palfrey’s prostitution service.

The Infowars broadcast generated other hard-hitting accusations and revelations in a week that saw the National Enquirer publish a front-page story suggesting that Sibley’s revelations would point to GOP presidential candidate Ted Cruz as a customer of Palfrey’s defunct high-end “escort” service Pamela Martin & Associates.

Ted Cruz "A Time For Truth"This week's Enquirer story follows one there on March 23 headlined Shocking Claims: Pervy Ted Cruz Caught Cheating — With 5 Secret Mistresses!  The first story alleged that Cruz had had affairs with "A Hooker, A Teacher & Coworkers." The tabloid did not identify the women, whose faces were pixelated, as indicated in the adjoining photo.

But three of the women allegedly involved have denied the article's veracity. Enquirer readers and others claimed to have identified the three from other widely distributed photos that show their faces. One, CNN commentator Amanda Carpenter, was accused on air by a fellow CNN panelist but denied a romantic link to Cruz.

Cruz, challenging Donald Trump for the lead in the GOP race and the author of a campaign autobiography A Time For Truth portraying his commitment to family and other conservative values, denied the Enquirer's allegations April 4 in an interview with Fox News host Megyn Kelly. People Magazine published an extensive treatment of his denial in Ted Cruz Responds to Affair Allegations: 'I Have Always Been Faithful to My Wife' by Tierney McAfee.

Skeptics immediately suggested that Cruz, who was married in 2001, could have been engaging in lawyer word games. Palfrey operated her service for 13 years until 2006, when her California home was raided. She was convicted of federal racketeering charges forcing her to face 55 years in prison. Before beginning a sentence, she died in 2008 by hanging under mysterious circumstances at her mother's home. Authorities ruled it suicide.

Montgomery Blair Sibley and Debra Jean PalfreyAlex Jones, the Texas-based founder of the Infowars broadcasts, hosted her on his show shortly before her death at age 52. Jones broadcast her statement that she would never kill herself.

Jones and investigative reporter Wayne Madsen ascribe her death to murder by CIA assassins whose colleagues use prostitution services at times for political blackmail and other sinister purposes. Other reporters and confidantes believe she killed herself out of depression in view of public apathy about the injustices in her case, including her long prospective prison sentence.

Sibley, shown with Palfrey on the cover of his 2009 book treatment of the case, has said all his information will become automatically public on four servers located around the world within 72 hours if he "disappears."

On the Infowars broadcast April 9, Madsen alleged that prostitution-related scandal and blackmail are pervasive among high government officials.

Madsen named as participants several of the most famous names in politics for the first time on the show. Madsen's many articles on the DC Madam scandal include more than a half dozen beginning in 2007 naming then Vice President Dick Cheney as one of her customers while he was Halliburton's president and CEO and while Palfrey's call girls worked with many others in political, defense, and intelligence sectors.

Madsen noted that Ted Cruz worked on the Bush-Cheney campaign and transition team, which used an office in McLean identified by Palfrey's now-public records as a customer site.

So, Madsen said in seconding Sibley's plea, the public needs to know the names before this year's elections.

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To help researchers of President John F. Kennedy's 1963 assassination and its current implications, the Justice Integrity Project began publishing a Reader's Guide in 2013 to coincide with the shooting's 50th anniversary.

Some columns, particularly No. 17 below, catalog significant books arguing all viewpoints. Other columns provide analysis.

Included are columns best-selling author Peter Dale Scott and San Francisco attorney Bill Simpich. Each is affiliated with the start-up research group CAPA (Citizens Against Political Assassinations), as is this editor.

Dealey Plaza Panorama (Andrew Kreig Photo)Research inputs are welcome, including suggested additions. Similar initiatives are planned to help illuminate other major assassinations and attempted assassinations of great controversy and historical importance.

The specifics of President Kennedy's life, death and legacy hold a rare fascination for the public as a guide to today's current events and official reports.

The JFK assassination has generated more than two thousand books in whole or part. More than three million pages of relevant government have been declassified thanks to countless researchers. Public opinion polls for decades have revealed a rare if not unique disconnect whereby between 60 and more than 75 percent of those polled typically say they do not believe the 1964 report by the blue-ribbon Warren Commission.

Above right is a Justice Integrity Project photo showing Dealey Plaza, where Kennedy was killed on Nov. 22, 1963. The Texas Book Depository Building where accused assassin Lee Harvey Oswald worked is behind the row of trees. The car in the center lane is near the location of the president's limo at the time of the fatal shot.

Dozens of witnesses, mostly ignored by authorities, reported hearing shooting from the so-called "Grassy Knoll" at the photo's left. Not visible is a tall, opaque picket fence obscured by the road sign at the far left.

Many researchers -- but not the Warren Commission -- have argued that at least one shooter hid behind the picket fence and escaped via the near-empty railroad yard behind the fence.

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The U.S. State Department last week ordered American military and diplomatic families to withdraw from Turkey. The pullout shows the West's growing concerns about the NATO member's shift to authoritarian, belligerent and pro-Islamic policies.

Regarded just a few years ago as a stable, prosperous nation with a rare combination of pro-democratic traditions and a Muslim majority, Turkey's geo-political position and internal security are rapidly declining and fostering threats to a larger region.

Today's column summarizes these developments, documented by a long appendix of news stories since Turkey's ruling AKP party won a surprisingly strong (and some say suspicious) election victory Nov. 1 with just short of 50 percent of the announced vote. The news reports are drawn from a mixture of alternative and mainstream sources and present a far different view of ISIS, Turkey and United States-led activities than Western audiences normally see.

The gist is that President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan's ambitions have boomeranged, thereby diminishing his clout and country.

He has helped his allies foster the disgraceful covert actions enabling the civil war in Syria, thereby generating the massive refugee crisis destroying many lives and undermining the European Union. His fatal shootdown of a Russian fighter in Syria last November could have prompted a much Recep Erdoganwider war involving NATO but instead seems merely to have strengthened Russian resolve to punish Turkey, expose its ties to ISIS and other jihadists — and otherwise ensure that the ambitions of Turkey and its allies are thwarted in the key battlefield of Syria.

A columnist in Newsweek last month described Erdoğan, shown in a file photo, "as out of control" and in danger of overthrow, as described more fully below.

For years, however, Western media have failed for the most part to report except in isolated instances how Turkey, the United States and other allies have secretly supported a rebellion in Syria by smuggling in arms and foreign fighters to foster the illusion that the intended overthrow was domestic unrest.

At this point, Turkey's troubles include two major terrorist atrocities recently in major cities and reprisals by government. The mayhem includes its ongoing covert war against neighboring areas of Syria, plus crackdowns on accused terrorists, journalists, dissidents, religious and ethnic minorities. 

Turkey's flailing and repressive responses carry huge implications for both its population as well as for NATO, and regional players that include Israel, the Persian Gulf Monarchies, Iraq, Iran and Lebanon 

A major part of the decline in Turkey's global position stems from Erdoğan's zeal for his multi-nation alliance to keep trying to overthrow Syria's government. Since the effort began in 2011Turkey has supported rebels that include ethnic Turks located in northern Syria, the so-called Free Syrian Army, and radical jihadists whom Turkey has helped smuggle into Syria from elsewhere around the world.

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Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Google and Israeli intelligence enthusiastically cooperated in hopes of overthrowing Syria’s government in efforts that have led to hundreds of thousands of deaths and millions of refugees, according to a trove of emails recently organized for release by WikiLeaks.

Hillary Clinton Benghazi Committee CNN Pompeo 10-22-15One email stated that Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s fall could lead to a religious war in the region, “which, in the view of Israeli commanders would not be a bad thing for Israel and its Western allies.”

The email, as well as a separate one describing a secret high-level effort within Google to assist the State Department in regime change for Syria, is one of the Clinton-linked emails organized by WikiLeaks into a searchable database announced last week.

These help paint a picture of the Democratic front-runner as a zealous advocate of covert activities to overthrow foreign leaders opposed by U.S. elites. Clinton is shown in a file photo as she parried GOP attacks during a House hearing in October on the 2012 killing of U.S. personnel at Benghazi, a process that was easier for her than apparent because she secretly shared certain goals with her interrogators, as described below.

Hillary Clinton's WikiLeaks Email ArchiveThe mainstream media for the most part have ignored the remarkable email revelations from recent days contained in Clinton's emails from 2009 to 2013 as secretary of state.

Only a handful of alternative and mostly web-based commentary sites have covered the story so far. Yet the emails help connect the dots from her 2003 support of the Iraq invasion as a senator to the vast suffering from regime change in Libya and Syria, including such collateral results as the refugee migration to Europe and blowback by terrorists dispersed there.

The de facto news blackout on the stories by United States media suggests also why WikiLeaks and its founder Julian Assange are so widely reviled by government officials and their allies in the media.

WikiLeaks enables whistleblowers to bypass many control mechanisms to suppress sensitive matters normally covered only in partial fashion by foreign policy decision-makers and their most friendly news outlets, which now include tech giants like Google (the best known subsidiary of the new parent company Alphabet).

Today's column — describing the shocking contents of the recent Clinton emails — builds on the first part of our new WikiLeaks series:  Noted Swedish Journalist, Assange Critic Exposed As Police Agent, published March 20, 2016.

That segment reported how Martin Fredriksson, a prize-winning Swedish journalist known for his left-wing, pro-NATO and anti-WikiLeaks commentary, was revealed this month to have been a paid agent of Säpo, Sweden's security service.

Fredriksson, with roots also in the high-tech community, also advocated against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange and urged Sweden's chapter of Amnesty International to avoid supporting Sweden's relentless pursuit of Assange for questioning regarding sex misconduct complaints arising in 2010.

The third part of our series will examine the dubious legality of Sweden's crusade against Assange, which has caused a United Nations panel last month to find that Assange's political asylum in Ecuador's London Swedish flagembassy since June 2012 as arbitrary detention as a violation of human rights.

Assange has denied any crime in the sexual complaints.

Also, he has accused Sweden (whose flag is shown at left) of mounting a trumped up probe so it can extradite him to the United States to face reprisal for publishing hacked emails embarrassing to United States and other diplomats. U.S. authorities have not commented on whether they have filed secret charges (as Assange claims) against him and his colleagues working for the pro-transparency site WikiLeaks.

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A prize-winning Swedish journalist noted for his left-wing, pro-NATO and anti-WikiLeaks commentary was revealed this month to have been a paid agent of Säpo, his nation's security service.

Martin Fredriksson WikimediaMartin Fredriksson, shown in a file photo and a winner of a major investigative reporting prize in 2014 for his work exposing right-wing groups opposed to NATO, has been secretly paid for years by Säpo, the Swedish Security Service, according to news reports based on his own admissions.

In deep intrigue that resembles a spy novel, Fredriksson's story undermines conventional wisdom on both sides of the Atlantic that journalists work independently from power centers, including government agencies.

Also, the tale is timely, especially because of Sweden's ongoing persecution of Wikileaks Founder Julian Assange and new revelations by that transparency advocacy group involving Democratic presidential front-runner Hillary Clinton and the Obama administration.

Julian Assange Indicter Authorities have targeted Assange (shown in a file photo) for what appears to be a trumped up sex scandal probe that has extended for nearly six years, apparently in reprisal for massive and ongoing disclosures by WikiLeaks of Western governments' dark secrets.

More generally, United States and NATO pressures upon European leaders are tainting the latter's carefully nurtured images of independence.

Sweden, which has long boasted of an official position of neutrality in world affairs and close adherence to humanitarian and democratic principles under a rule of law, has already hurt its image by its pursuit of Assange. The fallout includes a ruling last month by a United Nations panel that Assange's political asylum in Ecuador's embassy in London since June 2012 to avoid extradition amounts to “arbitrary detention” under international law. 

The Indicter, a start-up global human rights commentary site, underscored in columns March 6 and 13 the sinister implications of the revelations, especially the seemingly odd mixture of Fredriksson's advocacy against Assange and in favor of NATO. The Indicter revealed, for example, that Fredriksson used his clout to lobby for Amnesty International opposition to Assange.

Marcello Ferrado de Noli The Indicter's editor is Marcello Ferrada de Noli, Ph.D., shown at left, and a longtime Swedish medical school professor and leader of Swedish Doctors for Human Rights. He drew on disclosures March 2 about Fredriksson in SVD (Svenska Dagbladet, or Swedish Daily) to illustrate a broader theme: that Swedish officials and thought leaders defer far more to the United States and authoritarian policies than commonly understood in liberal democracies, including Sweden.

Sweden's highly irregular investigation of Assange illustrates his thesis.

Ecuador granted Assange political asylum in its London embassy three and half years ago to protect him from a relentless effort by Swedish authorities to extradite him for questioning over rape and sexual assault allegations arising from two affairs he undertook from invitations by women attending his featured speech at an August 2010 conference in Sweden.

Assange submitted to questioning about the claims from the two women, who had separately invited him to stay with them. Authorities have never charged him with a crime but they have mounted an extraordinary campaign to extradite him to Sweden for further questioning after he left the country.

Assange has denied any criminal violation. Also, he has argued unsuccessfully in British courts that the investigation has been a ruse to extradite him to Sweden so he could then be extradited to the United States to face reported but still-secret U.S. charges. Assange is not subject to extradition directly from Britain to the United States. U.S. charges are reported to arise from WikiLeaks disclosures that severely embarrassed officials in the United States, Britain, Sweden and elsewhere in Western governments and private power centers.

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Americans deserve thorough disclosure of the nation’s major assassinations says a new research group at the start of the annual “Sunshine Week” beginning March 13.

As an initial goal, Citizens Against Political Assassinations (CAPA), a non-partisan umbrella group, seeks withheld records pertaining to the assassinations of President John F. Kennedy in 1963 and the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. and New York Senator Robert F. Kennedy in 1968.  

John F. Kennedy side profile“CAPA seeks release of the remaining JFK records with a minimum of redactions, which can obscure vital information,” said CAPA Chairman Cyril H. Wecht, M.D., J.D., a prominent expert in forensic pathology for five decades.

“We shall also file Freedom of Information Act requests and similar legal actions to enforce the law and undertake public education efforts to show the importance of disclosure to new generations.” Wecht, shown below in his lab, is a world-renowned consultant, medical school professor, author, and former county coroner for two decades in Pennsylvania.

Dr. Cyril Wecht in labThis editor is one of nine CAPA directors along with Wecht, and is also the media liaison for the CAPA announcement, which is timed to coincide with the annual Sunshine Week launched by Florida journalists and then nationally in 2005 by the American Society of Newspaper Editors (ASNE) with funding from the Knight Foundation. The purpose is to advocate for open government and warn against the dangers of excessive secrecy.

In Washington, DC, the National Press Club and Newseum are among the organizations sponsoring events during the week seeking more transparency by government. There are many challenges for the media and the public in obtaining from government information once regarded as routine. For example, the Washington Post reported in its Sunday, March 13 print edition, The federal government no longer cares about disclosing public information.

This editor shares those goals as an active member of more than a half dozen journalism and legal bodies, including the National Press Club's Press Freedom Committee and several other of the largest and oldest journalism bodies, such as SPJ, ASJA, and the Overseas Press Club. But an urgent need exists also for more for targeted advocacy efforts on the topic of assassinations, especially since the major media have proven extremely reluctant to use their influence to report sensitive aspects of major assassinations -- much less lobby for additional disclosures.

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