Photos, Assad Family

Asma Assad Wikipedia

Philadelphia Inquirer, Philly.com, Did you know that Asma Al-Assad, Syrian First Lady and wife of Bashar Al-Assad, was featured in Vogue? Leah Kauffman POSTED: Thursday, August 29, 2013, 11:42 PM Did you know that Asma Al-Assad, Syria's first lady, the wife of Bashar Al-Assad, was featured in Vogue Magazine? In March of 2011, Vogue published an article on the British-born first lady with the headline: “A Rose in the Desert.” Detailing her collection of designer clothing and describing her as "the freshest and most magnetic of first ladies”, the article portrayed the Assads as a democratic, progressive family. Vogue has since removed the article from its site, but you can read excerpts here. Here are 3 other things you should know about Asma Al-Assad: She was born in London to a Syrian cardiologist and married Al-Assad in 2000. She graduated King’s College in London and worked at Deutsche Bank and JP Morgan. In 2005, she gave a rare interview to the New York Times where she said Al-Assad ''gave me back my humanity.''

 

 

 

Financial Times, Lunch with the FT  (Financial Times) -- Asma Assad, Aug. 31, 2013. To discuss the gas attack in Damascus, I have lunch with Asma, the wife of President Assad. We meet at Il Circo restaurant, at the Four Seasons Hotel, in Damascus. Asma orders Pizza Margherita, which has Buffalo Mozzarella, Tomato and Fresh Basil; I order Grilled Sea Bass with Sautéed Vegetables and Caper Sauce.  Asma was born in Acton, in London. Her father was a consultant at the Cromwell Hospital. Asma graduated from King's College London in 1996 with a degree in computer science and a diploma in French literature. Asma takes a keen interest in women's rights, education and the alleviation of poverty.  ask Asma about democracy. Asma says: "Obama should listen to the American voters. "The American people do not want Obama to support the terrorists in Syria." What about Libya? Asma frowns and says: "More people were killed in Libya after the so called liberation than before."

Our food arrives.

Asma's family.

Asma worries about the Christians in Syria. "Thousands of Christian refugees have found protection in Syria," explains Asma. "These people are at risk of being wiped out if the terrorists come to power."

And what about chemical weapons?

"At school in London," says Asma, "We were taught that the British used chemical weapons in World War I." "Italy used chemical weapons in Ethiopia. "The USA used chemical weapons in Vietnam and in Iraq. I hope that we will never use chemical weapons."

Assad, loved by most Syrians

I point out that survivors of the gas attack in Damascus are blaming the CIA asset Prince Bandar and his al-Nusra rebels for the gas attack.

"Well, certainly we did not do it," says Asma.

John McCain in Syria meeting al Qaeda
Asma notes that John McCain was in Syria, meeting rebels who are part of Al Qaeda. US military prepares to kill more innocent children. Reports Of Very Unusual Troop Movements In The U.S. And Air Power Massing In Cyprus. The Pentagon's Anti-Syria operations began in 2007, according to Seymour Hersh in the New Yorker.

I suggest to Asma that there could soon be a false flag attack in Britain


This would be organised by the people who are angry that the UK is not going to bomb Syria's hospitals and schools. Asma says she certainly worries that further false flag attacks will lead to a full scale American invasion.

"What happens then?" asks Asma. "Does Israel then grab a bigger part of Syria? Do Qatar and Saudi Arabia then get their oil pipeline through Syria?"

Obama's friends, the Al Nusra Front terrorists (Al Qaeda in Syria), execute Syrian prisoners.

Over coffee I ask Asma about Obama. "I feel sorry for Obama," says Asma. "I think he had a difficult childhood. His family was a CIA family and those people have done some terrible things."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asma_al-Assad

Wikipedia, Asma al-Assad (Arabic: أسماء الأسد‎, Levantine pronunciation: [ˈʔasma lˈʔasad] or [ʔasˈmaːʔ elˈʔasad]) born 11 August 1975, née Asma al-Akhras (Arabic: أسماء فواز الأخرس‎, [ˈʔasma fawˈwaːz elˈʔaxras]), is the British-Syrian First Lady of Syria.[2][3] Born, raised and educated in the United Kingdom by Syrian-born parents, she graduated from King's College London in 1996 with a bachelor's degree in computer science and French literature. She briefly pursued a career in international investment banking before moving to Syria to marry President Bashar al-Assad in December 2000. Asma al-Assad is currently subject to economic sanctions relating to high level Syrian government officials, making it illegal in the European Union to provide her with certain material assistance, or for her to obtain certain products and curtailing her ability to travel within the EU excluding to the United Kingdom.

FT Magazine, Bashar al-Assad: behind the mask, Roula Khalaf, June 15, 2012. He was an unpromising youth who gained power by accident. Today he’s the Arab world’s most notorious dictator. But who really is this man?

Vogue, Asma al-Assad: A Rose of the Desert, Joan Juliet Buck, photographed by James Nachtwey, Asma al-Assad is glamorous, young, and very chic — the freshest and most magnetic of first ladies. Her style is not the couture - and-bling dazzle of Middle Eastern power but a deliberate lack of adornment. She’s a rare combination: a thin, long-limbed beauty with a trained analytic mind who dresses with cunning understatement. Paris Match calls her “the element of light in a country full of shadow zones.” She is the first lady of Syria. Syria is known as the safest country in the Middle East, possibly because, as the State Department’s Web site says, “the Syrian government conducts intense physical and electronic surveillance of both Syrian citizens and foreign visitors.” It’s a secular country where women earn as much as men and the Muslim veil is forbidden in universities, a place without bombings, unrest, or kidnappings, but its shadow zones are deep and dark.

http://aangirfan.blogspot.com/2012/04/cia-brainwashing-of-obama.html

Financial Times, Lunch with the FT (Financial Times) --Asma Assad, Aug. 31, 2013. To discuss the gas attack in Damascus, I have lunch with Asma, the wife of President Assad. We meet at Il Circo restaurant, at the Four Seasons Hotel, in Damascus. Asma orders Pizza Margherita, which has Buffalo Mozzarella, Tomato and Fresh Basil; I order Grilled Sea Bass with Sautéed Vegetables and Caper Sauce. Asma was born in Acton, in London. Her father was a consultant at the Cromwell Hospital. Asma graduated from King's College London in 1996 with a degree in computer science and a diploma in French literature. Asma takes a keen interest in women's rights, education and the alleviation of poverty. I ask Asma about democracy. Asma says: "Obama should listen to the American voters. "The American people do not want Obama to support the terrorists in Syria."

What about Libya?

Asma frowns and says: "More people were killed in Libya after the so called liberation than before."

Our food arrives.

Asma's family.

Asma worries about the Christians in Syria. "Thousands of Christian refugees have found protection in Syria," explains Asma. "These people are at risk of being wiped out if the terrorists come to power."

Asma
And what about chemical weapons?

"At school in London," says Asma, "We were taught that the British used chemical weapons in World War I." "Italy used chemical weapons in Ethiopia. "The USA used chemical weapons in Vietnam and in Iraq. I hope that we will never use chemical weapons."

Assad, loved by most Syrians.

I point out that survivors of the gas attack in Damascus are blaming the CIA asset Prince Bandar and his al-Nusra rebels for the gas attack.

"Well, certainly we did not do it," says Asma.

John McCain in Syria meeting al Qaeda.
Asma notes that John McCain was in Syria, meeting rebels who are part of Al Qaeda. US military prepares to kill more innocent children. Reports Of Very Unusual Troop Movements In The U.S. And Air Power Massing In Cyprus. The Pentagon's Anti-Syria operations began in 2007, according to Seymour Hersh in the New Yorker.

I suggest to Asma that there could soon be a false flag attack in Britain.
This would be organised by the people who are angry that the UK is not going to bomb Syria's hospitals and schools. Asma says she certainly worries that further false flag attacks will lead to a full scale American invasion.

"What happens then?" asks Asma. "Does Israel then grab a bigger part of Syria? Do Qatar and Saudi Arabia then get their oil pipeline through Syria?"

Obama's friends, the Al Nusra Front terrorists (Al Qaeda in Syria), execute Syrian prisoners.

Over coffee I ask Asma about Obama. "I feel sorry for Obama," says Asma. "I think he had a difficult childhood. His family was a CIA family and those people have done some terrible things."

The CIA Brainwashing of Obama, April 30, 2012. There is a belief that Obama has been subjected to CIA mind control and that these CIA mind controllers are fans of the occult. 
http://aangirfan.blogspot.com/2012/04/cia-brainwashing-of-obama.htm

 

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Related News Coverage

Asma Assad seatedWikiepedia, Asma al-Assad. Asma al-Assad born 11 August 1975, née Asma al-Akhras (Arabic: أسماء فواز الأخرس‎, [ˈʔasma fawˈwaːz elˈʔaxras]), is the British-Syrian First Lady of Syria.[2][3] Born, raised and educated in the United Kingdom by Syrian-born parents, she graduated from King's College London in 1996 with a bachelor's degree in computer science and French literature. She briefly pursued a career in international investment banking before moving to Syria to marry President Bashar al-Assad in December 2000. Asma al-Assad is currently subject to economic sanctions relating to high level Syrian government officials, making it illegal in the European Union to provide her with certain material assistance, or for her to obtain certain products and curtailing her ability to travel within the EU excluding to the United Kingdom.

Philadelphia Inquirer /Philly.com, Did you know that Asma Al-Assad, Syrian First Lady and wife of Bashar Al-Assad, was featured in Vogue? Leah Kauffman Aug. 29, 2013. Did you know that Asma Al-Assad, Syria's first lady, the wife of Bashar Al-Assad, was featured in Vogue Magazine? In March of 2011, Vogue published an article on the British-born first lady with the headline: “A Rose in the Desert.” Detailing her collection of designer clothing and describing her as "the freshest and most magnetic of first ladies”, the article portrayed the Assads as a democratic, progressive family. Vogue has since removed the article from its site, but you can read excerpts here. Here are 3 other things you should know about Asma Al-Assad: She was born in London to a Syrian cardiologist and married Al-Assad in 2000. She graduated King’s College in London and worked at Deutsche Bank and JP Morgan. In 2005, she gave a rare interview to the New York Times where she said Al-Assad ''gave me back my humanity.''

Financial Times, Lunch with the FT  (Financial Times) -- Asma Assad, Aug. 31, 2013. To discuss the gas attack in Damascus, I have lunch with Asma, the wife of President Assad. We meet at Il Circo restaurant, at the Four Seasons Hotel, in Damascus. Asma orders Pizza Margherita, which has Buffalo Mozzarella, Tomato and Fresh Basil; I order Grilled Sea Bass with Sautéed Vegetables and Caper Sauce. 
Asma was born in Acton, in London. Her father was a consultant at the Cromwell Hospital. Asma graduated from King's College London in 1996 with a degree in computer science and a diploma in French literature. Asma takes a keen interest in women's rights, education and the alleviation of poverty.

Daily Beast, Syria's Fake First Family, Joan Juliet Buck, July 30, 2012. Just before the Arab Spring, Vogue writer Joan Juliet Buck did an infamous interview with Syria's first lady. For the first time, she tells the story behind the debacle.

FT Magazine, Bashar al-Assad: Behind the mask, Roula Khalaf, June 15, 2012. He was an unpromising youth who gained power by accident. Today he’s the Arab world’s most notorious dictator. But who really is this man?

Financial Times, How Qatar seized control of the Syrian revolution, Roula Khalaf and Abigail Fielding-Smith, May 17, 2013. As the Arab world’s bloodiest conflict grinds on, Qatar has emerged as a driving force: pouring in tens of millions of dollars to arm the rebels. Yet it also stands accused of dividing them -- and of positioning itself for even greater influence in the post-Assad era.

Vogue, Asma al-Assad: A Rose of the Desert, Joan Juliet Buck, photographed by James Nachtwey, March 2011. Asma al-Assad is glamorous, young, and very chic — the freshest and most magnetic of first ladies. Her style is not the couture - and-bling dazzle of Middle Eastern power but a deliberate lack of adornment. She’s a rare combination: a thin, long-limbed beauty with a trained analytic mind who dresses with cunning understatement. Paris Match calls her “the element of light in a country full of shadow zones.” She is the first lady of Syria. Syria is known as the safest country in the Middle East, possibly because, as the State Department’s Web site says, “the Syrian government conducts intense physical and electronic surveillance of both Syrian citizens and foreign visitors.” It’s a secular country where women earn as much as men and the Muslim veil is forbidden in universities, a place without bombings, unrest, or kidnappings, but its shadow zones are deep and dark.

Asma Assad Queen Elizabeth2002.jpgBritain's Queen Elizabeth II, right, receives Asma Al-Assad, left, wife of Syrian President Bashar Al-Assad, center, Tuesday, Dec. 17, 2002, at Buckingham Palace, London. (Ap Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth/PA/Pool) According to the official Instagram feed of the Syrian presidency, she feeds the hungry, and comforts the needy. Photos of Asma Al-Assad have been popping up all over the Syrian Presidency Instagram feed. In one photo, it appears that she is wiping tears away from a young boy’s face.

 

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